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Future Cities: Do Cities Have Limits? Workshop and Public Lecture

When:
Monday, 18 April 2016
Time:
9:30am - 6:00pm (Workshop), 6:00pm - 7:30pm (Public Lecture)
Where:
Room 526, James Watt (South) Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK G12 8QQ get directions

This one-day workshop will provide a platform for blue-sky thinking on the future of cities with a 50+ year time horizon. The objective of the event is to identify key questions for the deep future from a range of perspectives including engineering, architecture and the arts:

  • Looking to the future, what problems do cities solve?
  • Can cities flourish in extreme environments (arid zones, sea-standing, high latitude)?
  • Can the build-out of infrastructure keep pace with rapid inflows of population?
  • Will ultra-high speed transit lead to city sprawl, or the fragmentation of cities?
  • Can cities be modular, reconfigurable systems which can adapt to their citizen's needs?
  • Can infrastructure be completed decentralised, and if so do we even need cities?

The workshop (50 places) will be followed by a public lecture ('The Nature of the City') delivered by Professor Jesse Ausubel (Rockefeller University). Separate registration is required for the public lecture (200 places). Both the workshop and lecture are FREE to attend, but registration is required via Eventbrite (see links below).

Both events are organised by the University of Glasgow (School of Engineering) and Glasgow School of Art (Glasgow Urban Lab), supported by the University of Glasgow EPSRC Institution Sponsorship Fund and EPSRC Impact Accelerator Account.

Programme

UBDC Director, Prof. Vonu Thakuriah will speak from 1:40pm - 2:00pm on "Future human and freight mobility and potential impacts on cities" and will chair the Q&A Group Discussion from 3:45pm - 4:00pm.

The full day programme can be viewed and downloaded from the Workshop web page.

Register for the Workshop (Eventbrite)

Register for the Public Lecture (Eventbrite)

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