Private rented housing and social justice – the effects of housing tenure on education, employment, well-being and health

In the last 10 years the private rented sector has experienced rapid growth which has taken both policy-makers and academics by surprise. Geographical dispersion, diffuse ownership and mobile tenants make the sector difficult to study by conventional surveys.

Using linked urban data this project will build a picture of the scale, location and quality of the sector by amalgamating a range of public and private data. We explore access to data on: property ownership and occupancy; finance, transactions and rental market conditions; stock conditions; landlord registrations; and welfare benefits.

The data will help identify impacts of living in rented accommodation on mobility and location choice, and hence on outcomes in: education; labour market; and health and social care. Links will explored to data on: school attendance and outcomes; unemployment and employment; and health records. The team will also compare data on private rented and social rented tenants across these domains.

 

Researchers

Project Co-Leads: Nick Bailey and Nigel Sprigings